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How Much Is A Cat X-Ray? What You Can Expect To Pay (2023)

How Much Is A Cat X-Ray? What You Can Expect To Pay (2023)

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An x-ray is an imaging test that uses a small amount of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the body.

Doctors can use the images produced by x-rays to diagnose medical conditions, determine the severity of injuries, and monitor the progress of treatments.

If you’ve been told your cat needs an x-ray, or you’re just curious about the price for this diagnostic imaging tool, you must be wondering how much is a cat x-ray?

In this article, I will go over the price range for an x-ray procedure, how different types of x-rays differ in price (hint: abdominal x-ray and whole body x-ray have different prices!), and whether pet insurance companies cover them!

How Much Is A Cat X-Ray?

Digital X-ray of a cat in side view

Generally speaking, cat x-rays cost between $100 to $500, but they can go as high as $1000 for a full body x-ray.

The cost of a cat x-ray will vary depending on multiple factors, such as:

• The type of x-ray

In a moment, I will go over the difference in price for different types of x-ray (for example, an abdominal x-ray is usually more expensive than a skeletal x-ray!).

• Number of x-rays needed to be taken

X-rays may need to be done multiple times for many different reasons. These can include the need for further detail, comparisons with previous images, monitoring a developing problem, or identifying a particular issue.

A higher number of x-rays taken usually means a higher price.

• The clinic you visit

Different clinics may have different x-ray prices, and the clinic’s location is a factor to be considered. For example, clinics in the city center usually price their services higher than some clinics outside the city center.

• Any additional treatments that may be needed

If the x-ray shows that additional treatment is necessary, you may need to pay.

Of course, it is best to consult with your veterinarian (or the vet clinic where your cat is getting its x-ray procedure done) to get an accurate cost estimate for a cat x-ray.

Different Types Of Cat X-Rays And Their Price

Cat x-ray film shows a hip fracture on left back leg

There are several types of x-rays that a cat might need, so let’s talk briefly about each.

Skeletal X-Ray – $100 to $200

This type of x-ray is used to view the bones and can help diagnose conditions such as bone fractures or osteoarthritis.

A veterinarian may recommend a skeletal x-ray if the cat shows signs of a condition affecting the bones, such as lameness or difficulty moving.

This type of x-ray can help diagnose fractures, dislocations, and other bone abnormalities.

Additionally, a skeletal x-ray can be used to diagnose conditions such as hip dysplasia (a condition in cats caused by a malformation of the hip joint) and osteoarthritis (a degenerative joint disease that commonly affects older cats).

The average cost of a cat skeletal x-ray is between $100 and $200.

Abdominal X-Ray – $100 to $400

This type of x-ray is used to view the abdominal organs and can help diagnose conditions such as kidney stones or gastrointestinal obstructions.

Cats may need an abdominal x-ray for a variety of reasons. For example, an abdominal x-ray can diagnose medical conditions or injuries that affect the abdominal organs, such as the liver, kidneys, or intestines.

This type of x-ray can also be used to diagnose conditions that cause abdominal swelling or pain, such as inflammation, infection, or different types of cancer.

Additionally, an abdominal x-ray can be used to diagnose issues with the urinary tract or reproductive organs or to determine the presence and cause of foreign objects in the stomach or intestines.

In general, the cost of a chest x-ray for a cat can range from $100 to $400.

Chest X-Ray – $100 to $400

This type of X-ray is used to view the chest and lungs and can help diagnose conditions such as pneumonia or lung cancer.

The most common reason for a chest x-ray in a cat is to diagnose respiratory issues, such as pneumonia or asthma.

In some cases, a chest x-ray may be necessary to diagnose the cause of a cat’s coughing, labored breathing, or other respiratory symptoms.

Chest x-rays can also be helpful in detecting heart conditions, such as heartworms or heart disease.

On average, a cat abdominal x-ray can cost anywhere from $100 to $400.

However, note that the cost of a chest x-ray is typically lower than that of an abdominal x-ray, as the latter requires more radiation and takes more time to complete.

Dental X-Ray – $50 to $150

Cats may need dental x-rays for a variety of reasons.

For example, dental x-rays can be used to diagnose dental conditions or injuries that are not visible to the naked eye.

This includes conditions such as a broken tooth, tooth decay, abscesses, or fractures that may be hidden beneath the surface of the cat’s tooth or below the gum line.

Dental x-rays can also be used to diagnose issues with the jaw or other bones in the mouth or to assess the overall health of the teeth and gums.

Additionally, dental x-rays can be used to plan and guide dental procedures, such as extractions or root canals.

The cost of a cat dental x-ray can vary depending on where you take your pet, but it typically ranges from $50 to $150.

Full Body X-Ray – $200 to $1000

A full body x-ray, also known as a “general survey x-ray,” may be recommended by a veterinarian if the cat shows signs of a medical condition that could affect multiple body systems.

For example, a full-body x-ray may be used to diagnose a foreign body that has been ingested and is obstructing the digestive tract or to diagnose a mass or tumor in multiple organs.

Additionally, a full body x-ray can be used to assess the cat’s overall health, including the bones, lungs, and heart.

It is important to note that full-body x-rays are typically only recommended when other diagnostic tests, such as blood work and ultrasound, do not provide a precise diagnosis.

Expect to pay anywhere from $200 to $1000 for a full body cat x-ray.

Check Your Pet Insurance Covers The Cost Of Cat X-Rays

Vets with a cat in the x-ray room

Most pet insurance plans will cover x-ray costs for cats. However, coverage may vary depending on the specific policy and the type of X-ray needed.

Some pet insurance policies may cover the cost of x-rays as part of their medical coverage, while others may not.

It is essential to carefully review the terms and conditions of your pet insurance policy to determine whether it covers X-rays for cats.

Additionally, it is always a good idea to contact your pet insurance provider to ask about their coverage for cat x-rays and to confirm that your policy will provide financial assistance for this type of medical procedure.

Why Would A Cat Need An X-Ray?

Veterinarians are capable of taking x-ray images of every part of your cat’s body, considering virtually any part of your cat’s body can be the site of a medical issue.

A cat may need an x-ray for a variety of reasons.

The most common reason for an x-ray in a cat is to diagnose injuries or abnormalities in the bones or soft tissues (internal organs).

X-rays can be used to diagnose health problems such as broken bones, arthritis, cancer, intestinal obstruction, bladder stones, and other diseases.

In some cases, an x-ray may be necessary to diagnose the cause of a cat’s symptoms, such as lameness, difficulty breathing, or abdominal pain.

It is important to go for a vet visit if you notice any changes in your cat’s health, as prompt diagnosis and treatment can improve its chances of a full recovery.

What Happens During An X-Ray Procedure?

Veterinarian doctor are going to do an x-ray of the breed Cornish Rex cat

The process of getting an x-ray for a cat is similar to the process for humans.

• Before the x-ray, the veterinarian may need to sedate the cat to keep them still during the procedure. This is especially important if the cat is anxious or in pain.

• Once the cat is sedated, the veterinarian will position them and the x-ray machine to get the best view of the imaged area.

• The x-ray only takes a few seconds, and the veterinarian will step behind a protective shield to operate the machine.

• After the x-ray, the veterinarian will review the radiograph to ensure they are clear and of good quality.

• The images will then be sent to a radiologist for interpretation, and the results will be shared with the veterinarian.

The entire x-ray procedure for a cat typically takes less than 30 minutes.

Will Your Cat Need To Be Sedated During The X-Ray Procedure?

 ginger sleeping cat lying on a table near a syringe and a stethoscope

In most cases, a cat will need to be sedated for an x-ray procedure.

This is because the cat needs to be still for the x-ray to be taken, and sedation can help ensure that the cat remains calm and comfortable during the procedure.

Sedation can also help to prevent the cat from struggling or trying to move, which can cause the X-ray image to be blurry or distorted.

Wrapping Up

A cat x-ray can be a valuable diagnostic tool to identify potential health issues and ensure the well-being of your furry friend. But how much is a cat x-ray? Let’s go over the most critical information regarding this topic:

• Cat x-rays can be expensive.

• Cat x-ray cost can range from $50 to $200 depending on the type of x-ray and number of x-rays needed.

• Additionally, costs may vary depending on the veterinarian, diagnostic facility, and location.

Cat owners, if you are looking for the cost of a cat x-ray, the best way to find out is to contact your local veterinary clinic.

They will be able to provide you with a cost estimate based on the type of x-ray and the area being x-rayed!

Your feline might need an x-ray for any of the following issues, so make sure to learn more about them:

Has Your Cat Broken A Leg? What Every Cat Owner Should Know

Helping My Cat With Broken Tail – How To Treat It Properly?

How To Cure A Cat Broken Toe? Symptoms, Treatment, & Care

Why Are My Cat's Lymph Nodes Swollen? 7 Potential Reasons

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